There & Back

A Look into The Golden Temple

Written by Naila Binte Zakaria

‘Theravada Dhatu Jadi’, also known as ‘The Golden Temple’ is one of the most exquisite and majestic Buddhist temples in Bangladesh, standing with pride in the heart of Balagata in Bandarban district. With the second largest Buddha statue in Bangladesh and intricate architecture design in golden colour, it is one of the main tourist attractions in the country.

Dhatu Jadi is a Theravada Buddhist temple perched on a small hill, six miles away from the town of Bandarban. While not an ancient temple, being constructed from 1995 to 2000, it has become a favoured pilgrimage destination because of the relics it contains. The temple belongs to the Theravada Buddhism order, which is practiced by the Marma or Mogh indigenous people, a dominant ethnic group in Bandarban. The Mogh tribe is of Arakan descent and people are festive and very welcoming. The Buddhist temple is known as kyang in local dialect. The temple was built in Arakanese architecture, adopting a South East Asian style.

The walk towards the Golden Temple is almost as stunning as the structure itself. The royal staircase and temple rising above is surrounded by rich foliage and it is a sight that would leave the visitors mesmerized. Coated with a rich gold colour, it emanates magnificence that one would never forget. The intricately designed structure demonstrates architectural mastery and enhances the beauty of the sculpture features here.

The royal staircase and temple rising above is surrounded by rich foliage and it is a sight that would leave the visitors mesmerized.

Other decorative pieces, such as the statures, the golden bell and the dragon evoke a vibrant aura.
Though Bangladesh has 99% Muslim, the Marma or Mogh tribal groups of the Chittagong Hill Tracts have been practicing Buddhism for many centuries.

Every full moon night, the temple is illuminated by thousands of clay lamps and the sight of the status of Buddha is something to behold. Each of these statues of Buddha are carved with specific hand positions, called mudras, which indicate particular aspects of the Buddha’s teachings.

The Golden Temple stays open for the visitors with a charge of 15tk for entrance. A strict dress code of ‘no shorts and no shoes’ is followed here. It is an important religious attraction and visitors should not miss out on the opportunity to take a tour to feast their eyes.

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